National Sexual Rights Law and Policy Database

South Korea

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Adult sex work edit topic

Evaluation code: Selling and buying sexual services criminalized

Which approach is taken?edit question

Selling and buying sexual services criminalized

Buying, selling, organising commercial sex, providing a place for commercial sex work, and advertising commercial sex are criminalised by the Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic and the Criminal Law Act. Article 2 of the Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic defines sexual traffic to include sexual intercourse in exchange for money or goods. Therefore, sex work is defined as a form of trafficking.

Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic, as amended July 29, 2014, Article 2 (Definitions) (1): The terms used in this Act shall mean as follows: 1. The term "sexual traffic" means committing any of the following acts for an unspecified person or becoming a partner thereof in return for receiving or promising to receive money, valuables or other property gains: (a) Sexual intercourse; (b) Pseudo-sexual intercourse using parts of the body, such as the mouth and anus, or implements (2) The term "acts of arranging sexual traffic, etc." means committing any of the following acts: (a) Arranging, soliciting for, enticing or coercing to engage in sexual traffic; (b) Providing a place for sexual traffic; (c) Providing funds, land or buildings, in awareness that they are used for sexual traffic.

Article 4: No person shall engage in acts falling under any of the following acts: (1) sexual traffic; (2) arranging sexual traffic;… (4) Employing or recruiting other persons for the purpose of having them engage in acts of selling sex or brokering or arranging jobs in awareness that sexual traffic takes place; (5) Conducting acts referred to in subpargraphs 1, 2, and 4 and advertising a business place in which such acts take place.

Article 19: (1) Any of the following persons shall be punished by imprisonment with labor for not more than three years or by a fine not exceeding 30 million won: (1) A person who has engaged in the conduct of arranging sexual traffic, etc; (2) A person who has recruited persons to engage in the conduct of selling sex; (3) A person who has brokered or arranged a job for another person to have such person engage in the conduct of selling sex. (2) Any of the following persons shall be punished by imprisonment with labor for not more than seven years or by a fine not exceeding 70 million won: (1) A person who has engaged in the conduct of arranging sexual traffic, etc. as a profession; (2) A person who has received a reward in return for recruiting persons to sell sex; (3) A person who has received a reward in return for brokering or arranging jobs to other persons to sell sex.

Article 20: (1) Any of the following persons shall be punished by imprisonment with labor for not more than three years or by a fine not exceeding 30 million won: (1) A person who has placed an advertisement (including advertising by means of various kinds of publications, printed materials, telephone, the Internet and other media; hereinafter the same shall apply) for the purpose of brokering or arranging jobs for other persons to engage in selling sex, or obscene activities, etc. referred to in Article 245 of the Criminal Act; (2) A person who has placed an advertisement on business places in which sexual traffic or acts of arranging sexual traffic, etc. take place; (3) A person who has placed an advertisement soliciting or enticing other persons to purchase sex. (2) Any person who has manufactured or supplied or has placed an advertisement referred to in paragraph (1) as a profession shall be punished by imprisonment with prison labor for not more than two years or by a fine not exceeding 10 million won. (3) Any person who has distributed an advertisement referred to in paragraph (1) or publications which carry such advertisement as a profession shall be punished by imprisonment with labor for not more than one year or by a fine not exceeding five million won

Article 21: (1) Any person who has engaged in the conduct of sexual traffic shall be punished by imprisonment with labor for not more than one year, by a fine not exceeding three million won, or by misdemeanor imprisonment, or by minor fine.

Criminal Law Act, Article 242: A person who induces, entices, or procures a person to engage in sexual intercourse for gain shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than three years or by a fine not exceeding fifteen million won.

If partial/total criminalization or an other punitive regulation, which acts are criminalized? How severe is the punishment?edit question

It is illegal to buy and sell sex and to organise commercial sex in any place (advertising, living off immoral earnings, operating a brothel, procuring etc).

  • Buying or selling sex = imprisonment for not more than one year or a fine not exceeding 3 million won (Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic Article 21).
  • Distributing advertisements for sex work = imprisonment for not more than one year or a fine not exceeding five million won (Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic, Article 20(3)).
  • Manufacturing or supplying advertisements for sex work as a profession= two years imprisonment or a fine not exceeding 10 million won (Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic, Article 20(2)).
  • Advertising a sexual traffic business or for others to purchase sex, arranging sex work, recruiting persons to sell sex = imprisonment for not more than 3 years or by a fine not exceeding 30 million won (Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic, Article 19(1) and 20(1)).
  • Inducing, enticing or procuring persons to engage in sex work for gain = imprisonment for not more than three years or a fine not exceeding fifteen million won (Criminal Law Article 242).
  • Arranging sex work as a profession, receiving a reward in return for recruiting persons to sell sex, receiving a reward for brokering or arranging jobs for others to sell sex = imprisonment for not more than 7 years or a fine of not more than 70 million won (Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic, Article 19 (2)).

If not criminalized, is there regulation?edit question

The Ministry of Justice operates schools for convicted male clients of sex workers who may attend seminars in lieu of punishment. (Sexuality, Poverty and the Law Programme, Sex work law: South Korea)

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No customary and religious law applies.

Adultery edit topic

Evaluation code: No

Is adultery a criminal offense?edit question

No.

In February 2015, the Constitutional Court abolished a 62-year-old law that criminalized extramarital affairs, ruling that the law suppressed personal freedoms. Under the former law, having sex with a married person who was not your spouse was punishable by up to two years in prison. (Associated Press, South Korea OKs adultery, condom stock soars, February 26, 2015).

What is the burden of proof?edit question

N/A

How severe is the punishment?edit question

N/A

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No information.

Evaluation code: 12-13

What is the age of sexual consent?edit question

12-13

The age of sexual consent is 13.

The Criminal Act, Article 305: A person who has sexual intercourse with another who is under thirteen years of age or commits an indecent act on such person shall be punished.

Are there defenses/exceptions?edit question

None

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No Customary and religious law / No information

Evaluation code: 12-13

What is the age of sexual consent?edit question

12-13

Same sex acts are legal in South Korea and there is an equal age of consent for same and different sex sexual acts. (ILGA, State-sponsored Homophobia: A World Survey of Laws: criminalisation, protection and recognition of same-sex love, May 2015, p. 26 & 30.).

See Age of sexual consent - Different sex section

Are there defenses/exceptions?edit question

None

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No Customary and religious law / No information

Conscientious Objection edit topic

Evaluation code: Permitted, with both referral and emergency service provision requirements

Is there a law or policy that permits health professionals to conscientiously object to the provision of any sexual and/or reproductive health service? If so, are there referrals or emergency service requirements?edit question

Permitted, with both referral and emergency service provision requirements.

Providers may refuse to provide medical treatment with “justifiable reason” unless in an emergency situations.Providers must try to refer persons to other institutions.

Medical Service Act, 2010, Article 15 (Prohibition, etc. of Refusal to Give Medical Examination or Treatment): (1) A medical person may not, upon receiving a request for medical treatment or assistance in childbirth, refuse to render his/her service without any justifiable reason. (2) Each medical person shall give the best treatment to any emergency patient in compliance with the Emergency Medical Service Act.

Framework Act on Health and Medical Services, 2008, Article 5 (Obligations of Health and Medical Services Personnel): (1) Health and medical services personnel shall endeavor to provide high-quality and appropriate health and medical treatment services with their knowledge, experience and conscience to patients. (2) No health and medical services personnel shall, when he/she has been requested to provide health and medical treatment services, refuse to comply with such request, unless any justifiable ground exists to the contrary. (3) Health and medical services personnel shall seek to refer persons who receive health and medical treatment services to other health and medical institutions and provide the relevant data on health and medical services to other health and medical institutions, when necessary for providing appropriate health and medical treatment services.

Where is this provision found?edit question

Medical Services Act and Framework Act on Health and Medical Services.

What are the grounds for refusal to provide an sexual and reproductive health service?edit question

“Justifiable reason”

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No information.

Contraception edit topic

Evaluation code: Not prohibited

Topic tags:

  • Legally restricted
  • Customary and Religious Laws

Are any contraceptives prohibited in the country?edit question

Not prohibited.

Mother and Child Health Act, 2012 (text provided by validator): Article 12 (Projects to Prevent Induced Abortion, etc.) (2) The Minister of Health and Welfare, the Governor of a Special Self-Governing Province, or the head of a Si/Gun/Gu may provide contraceptive pills or devices to those who want them, as stipulated by Ordinance of the Ministry of Health and Welfare.

Are there legal restrictions on contraceptives?edit question

Legally restricted. 

See below: Spousal consent to abortion.

What contraceptives are available? Are there restrictions?edit question

The following contraceptives are available in South Korea: Cervical caps, male condoms, diaphragms, implants injections, intrauterine device - Copper, intrauterine device - Hormonal, ring, patch, birth control pill (usually 6,000-10,000 won and many are available over-the-counter), morning after pill, tubal ligation, and vasectomy. (Tender Embrace Birthing, Types of Birth Control Available in Korea, 4 January 2016).

Male condom, male sterilization, female sterilization, intrauterine device, vaginal barrier method and the pill are the most common methods used. (United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, World Contraceptive Patterns 2013).

Until recently, the Government offered family planning services free of charge. The Government has now decided to impose user fees for family planning services, to eliminate the incentive schemes for the one-child family and to support instead a two-child policy. (United Nations, Republic of Korea, Abortion Policy)

Emergency contraception currently still requires a prescription. Although in August 2012 the Korean Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) decided to repeal an earlier initiative that would have approved emergency contraception for over-the-counter use, due to intense debate within the country among various stakeholders, the KFDA abandoned the reclassification initiative. (International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, EC Status and Availability, South Korea, 2012).

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

CRL applies.

The Christian Council of Korea, the country’s largest alliance of Christian churches, recently protested the Korea Food and Drug Administration’s reclassification of the morning after pill as over the counter medicine on the grounds that it can act as an abortifacient. (The Korea Herald, What should schools teach about sex?, July 23, 2012).

Crimes committed in the name of honour and passion edit topic

Evaluation code: No

Does the law provide for a complete defense to or mitigation of sentences for gender-based violence offenses based on honour, passion, provocation, loss of control or other similar factors?edit question

No.

The maximum penalties for killing or assaulting a spouse are heightened.

The Criminal Act, Article 51: In determining punishment, the following shall be taken into consideration… (2) Offender's relation to the victim… Article 250: (1) A person who kills another shall be punished by death, or imprisonment for life or for at least five years. (2) A person who kills one's own or any lineal ascendant of one's spouse shall be punished by death, imprisonment for life or for not less seven years.

Article 257: (1) A person who inflicts a bodily injury upon another shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than seven years or suspension of qualifications for not more than ten years or by a fine not exceeding ten million won. (2) When the crime as referred in paragraph (1) is committed on a lineal ascendant of the offender or of his spouse, one shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than ten years or a fine not exceeding fifteen million won.

Article 258: (1) A person who inflicts bodily injury upon another, thereby endangering one's life, shall be punished by imprisonment for at least one year up to ten years. (3) When the crimes of the preceding two paragraphs are committed on a lineal ascendant of the offender or of one's spouse, one shall be punished by limited imprisonment for at least two years

Article 259: (1) A person who inflicts bodily injury upon another, thereby causing his death, shall be punished by limited imprisonment for at least three years. (2) When the crime as referred to in paragraph (1) is committed on a lineal ascendant of the offender or of his spouse, he shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than five years, or a fine not exceeding seven million won.

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No information.

Marital rape edit topic

Evaluation code: Yes

Is marital rape criminalized?edit question

Yes

Although not explicitly included in the Criminal Act, the Supreme Court recognised marital rape in May 2013, when it upheld a lower court’s verdict that imprisoned a man who forced his wife to have sex while threatening her with a weapon. (Korea Joongang Daily, Man found guilty of marital rape, May 17, 2013)

The Criminal Act, Article 297: A person who, by means of violence or intimidation, has sexual intercourse with another shall be punished by imprisonment for a limited term of at least three years.

What is the burden of proof? Is it the same or different from rape outside of marriage?edit question

It is the same. The crime of rape is interpreted to include marital rape.

How severe is the punishment for marital rape? Is it the same or different from rape outside of marriage?edit question

It is the same - imprisonment for at least three years. The crime of rape is interpreted to include marital rape.

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No Customary and religious law / No information

Sexuality education edit topic

Evaluation code: Mandated

Does the legal framework protect the right to education?edit question

Yes.

Constitution of the Republic of Korea, Article 31: (1) All citizens shall have an equal right to receive an education corresponding to their abilities. (2) All citizens who have children to support shall be responsible at least for their elementary education and other education as provided by Act. (3) Compulsory education shall be free of charge. (4) Independence, professionalism, and political impartiality of education and the autonomy of institutions of higher learning shall be guaranteed under the conditions as prescribed by Act. (5) The State shall promote lifelong education.

Is there a law or policy mandating the government (or its regulatory bodies) to implement sexuality education? Is there a law or policy prohibiting the government (or its regulatory bodies) from implementing sexuality education?edit question

Mandated.

The Ministry of Education, Science and Technology currently requires all schools to provide 15 hours of sex education per year. Nevertheless, teachers can be reluctant to broach the subject, with some educators reluctant even to mention sex at all. (SBS News, 학교 성교육 연간 최소 15시간으로 확대 출처 : SBS 뉴스 원본 링크 , 22 October 2012).

School Health Act, 2010, Article 9 (Health Care for Students): The head of a school shall provide health education and take necessary measures for the physical development and promotion of physical strength, the medical treatment and prevention of diseases and the prevention of drinking, smoking and misuse and abuse of medicine, and sex education, etc. of students.

Article 9-2 (Health Education): The Minister of Education, Science and Technology shall provide health education systematically to all the students of schools pursuant to Article 2 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. In such cases, matters necessary for the operation, such as timing of education, books, etc., shall be determined by the Minister of Education, Science and Technology.

Does the law mandate the provision of sexuality education to certain age groups? If so, which ones? Does the law prohibit the provision of sexuality education to certain age groups? If so, which ones?edit question

Sexuality education is taught beginning in the first year of elementary school through high school. Schools must provide 10-17 hours of sex education per year by a teacher who specializes in sex education. In high school, schools may opt to select “health” as an elective course, which includes sexuality education. (The Hankyoreh, New sex-ed guidelines forbid teaching about homosexuality, March 30, 2015).

Early age classes including information about reproductive health and gender roles and equality, according to a spokeswoman for the Education Ministry. Middle school stuents learn about STIs, contraception, pregnancy, sex and dating, masturbation and controlling sexual diesre. (Andrew Cherry and Mary Dillon, International Handbook of Adolescent Pregnancy: Medical, Psychosocial and Public Health Responses, 2014, p. 570).

Later classes from sixth grade through high school address sexual assault prevention, prostitution, AIDS, contraception and how to cope with sexual urges. (The Korea Herald, What should schools teach about sex?, July 23, 2012).

Does the law mandate the provision of education on certain topics? If so, which ones? Does the law prohibit the provision of education on certain topics? If so, which ones?edit question

New guidelines were released in 2015 that exclude the discussion of homosexuality or of sexual minorities. In training material for sex-ed guidelines that was provided to schools by the education offices of each city and province on Mar. 29, the Ministry of Education states that “sex education is not intended to be an opportunity for teachers to share their views on sexuality” and that “teaching about homosexuality is not permitted.” Notably, the document also forbids the use of terminology indicating a variety of sexual orientations and orders schools to remove information about sexual minorities from their current curriculum.(The Hankyoreh, New sex-ed guidelines forbid teaching about homosexuality, March 30, 2015).

The sex education curriculum is comprised of four parts: human relationship and sexual psychology; human body development and sexual health; social environment and gender equality; and marriage and healthy family. All of these sections are embedded in the curriculum and designed to be school grade appropriate. The programming emphasizes knowledge about sex with the primary focus on safe sex, abstinence and virginity. (Andrew Cherry and Mary Dillon, International Handbook of Adolescent Pregnancy: Medical, Psychosocial and Public Health Responses, 2014, p. 570).

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No information.

Third party authorization for sexual and reproductive health services - general edit topic

Evaluation code: Yes

Is third party authorization in order to access any sexual and reproductive health services?edit question

Yes.

See the following section: Spousal consent to abortion

Evaluation code: No

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access any sexual and reproductive health service?edit question

No.

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No Customary and religious law / No information

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access oral contraceptives?edit question

No consent requirement.

The birth control pill is available over-the-counter at any pharmacy and does not require a prescription or a visit to the gynecologist in order to get it.

Framework Act on Health and Medical Services, Article 10 (Rights to Health, etc.): (1) All nationals shall have a right to live under the protection of the State under this Act or other Acts, with regard to their own health and that of their families. (2) No rights of nationals, with regard to their own health and that of their families, shall be infringed, due to gender, age, religion, social status, economic conditions or other grounds.

Mother and Child Health Act, 2012, Article 12 (Projects to Prevent Induced Abortion, etc.): (2) The Minister of Health and Welfare, the Governor of a Special Self-Governing Province, or the head of a Si/Gun/Gu may provide contraceptive pills or devices to those who want them, as stipulated by Ordinance of the Ministry of Health and Welfare.

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access intrauterine devices?edit question

No consent requirement.

See Parental consent to oral contraceptives

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access hormonal implants?edit question

No consent requirement.

See Parental consent to oral contraceptives

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access emergency contraception?edit question

No consent requirement

See Parental consent to oral contraceptives

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Topic tags:

  • Legally restricted

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access abortion?edit question

No consent requirement.

Costs of abortion are subsidized for indigent women, as well as in cases when sterilization is also performed at the time of abortion or when the pregnancy was due to failure of an intrauterine device. (United Nations, Republic of Korea, Abortion Policy)

Mother and Child Health Act, 2012, Article 14 (Limited Permission of Induced Abortion Operations): (1) A medical doctor may perform an induced abortion operation with the consent of the pregnant woman herself and her spouse (including persons in a de facto marital relationship; hereinafter the same shall apply) only in the following cases: (2) In cases under paragraph (1), if it is impossible to obtain the spouse's consent due to his/her death or disappearance, unknown whereabouts or other extenuating circumstances, the operation may be performed only with the principal's consent. (3) In cases under paragraph (1), if the woman or her spouse is unable to express her or his/her intention by any mental or physical disability, the consent by a person with parental authority or guardian may be substituted for that, and if there is no person with parental authority or guardian, the consent by a person who is liable to support her or him may be substituted for that.

Are there exceptions?edit question

Legally restricted.

Legally restricted: An abortion can be performed by a physician within 28 weeks of pregnancy. The consent of the pregnant woman is required, as well as that of her spouse if she is married (United Nations, Republic of Korea, Abortion Policy).

Mother and Child Health Act, Article 14 (1): A medical doctor may perform an induced abortion operation with the consent of the pregnant woman herself and her spouse (including persons in a de facto marital relationship; hereinafter the same shall apply) (1) Where she or her spouse suffers from any eugenic or genetic mental disability or physical disease prescribed by Presidential Decree; (2) Where she or her spouse suffers from any contagious disease prescribed by Presidential Decree; (3) Where she is impregnated by rape or quasi-rape; (4) Where pregnancy is taken place between blood relatives or matrimonial relatives who are legally unable to marry; (5) Where the maintenance of pregnancy severely injures or might injure the health of the pregnant woman for health or medical reasons.

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access sterilization?edit question

No consent requirement.

See Parental consent to oral contraceptives

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access HIV testing?edit question

No consent requirement.

Framework Act on Health Examinations, 2015, Article 4 (Rights, etc. of Nationals): (1) All nationals shall have the right to promote their health by means of national health examinations and there shall be no interference with any rights related to health examinations on the basis of gender, age, religion, social status, economic circumstances, etc. (3) All nationals shall endeavor to protect the health of their families and themselves from disease and to promote health through health examinations.

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirement

Do young people require the consent of their parents or legal guardians in order to access sexually transmitted infections testing?edit question

No consent requirement.

See Parental consent to HIV testing

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: Yes

Is the consent of a spouse/partner/father of the child required in order to access any sexual and reproductive health service?edit question

Yes.

See the following section: Spousal consent to abortion

Could customary and/or religious law apply?edit question

No Customary and religious law / No information

Evaluation code: No consent requirements

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access oral contraceptives?edit question

No consent requirements.

The birth control pill is available over-the-counter at any pharmacy and does not require a prescription or a visit to the gynecologist in order to get it.

Framework Act on Health and Medical Services, Article 6 (Rights of Patients and Health and Medical Services Personnel): (1) All patients shall have a right to receive appropriate health and medical treatment services to protect and improve their own health. Article 10 (Rights to Health, etc.): (1) All nationals shall have a right to live under the protection of the State under this Act or other Acts, with regard to their own health and that of their families. (2) No rights of nationals, with regard to their own health and that of their families, shall be infringed, due to gender, age, religion, social status, economic conditions or other grounds.

Mother and Child Health Act, 2012, Article 12 (Projects to Prevent Induced Abortion, etc.): (2) The Minister of Health and Welfare, the Governor of a Special Self-Governing Province, or the head of a Si/Gun/Gu may provide contraceptive pills or devices to those who want them, as stipulated by Ordinance of the Ministry of Health and Welfare

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirements

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access intrauterine devices?edit question

No consent requirements.

See Spousal consent to oral contraceptives

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirements

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access hormonal implants?edit question

No consent requirements.

See Spousal consent to oral contraceptives

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirements

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access emergency contraception?edit question

No consent requirements.

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: Spousal/IP/parent of child consent required

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access abortion?edit question

Spousal/IP/parent of child consent required.

Mother and Child Health Act, Article 14: (1) A medical doctor may perform an induced abortion operation with the consent of the pregnant woman herself and her spouse (including persons in a de facto marital relationship; hereinafter the same shall apply)...

Are there exceptions?edit question

Legally restricted, Other.

Legally restricted: See Parental consent to abortion section

Other: When the spouse cannot give consent due to extenuating circumstances, the abortion can be performed without his/her consent.

Mother and Child Health Act, Article 14 (2): In cases under paragraph (1), if it is impossible to obtain the spouse's consent due to his/her death or disappearance, unknown whereabouts or other extenuating circumstances, the operation may be performed only with the principal's consent

Evaluation code: No consent requirements

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access sterilization?edit question

No consent requirements.

See Spousal consent to oral contraceptives

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirements

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access HIV testing?edit question

No consent requirements.

Framework Act on Health Examinations, 2015, Article 4 (Rights, etc. of Nationals): (1) All nationals shall have the right to promote their health by means of national health examinations and there shall be no interference with any rights related to health examinations on the basis of gender, age, religion, social status, economic circumstances, etc. (3) All nationals shall endeavor to protect the health of their families and themselves from disease and to promote health through health examinations.

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A

Evaluation code: No consent requirements

Is the consent of a spouse, intimate partner or biological father/mother of the child required to access sexually transmitted infections testing?edit question

No consent requirements.

See Spousal consent to HIV testing

Are there exceptions?edit question

N/A